Hennessy And Patterson Computer Architecture A Quantitative Approach Pdf


By Germain J.
In and pdf
24.05.2021 at 06:06
6 min read
hennessy and patterson computer architecture a quantitative approach pdf

File Name: hennessy and patterson computer architecture a quantitative approach .zip
Size: 14469Kb
Published: 24.05.2021

Resources for Computer Architectures

By John L. Hennessy and David A. Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, Fifth Edition, explores the ways that software and technology in the cloud are accessed by digital media, such as cell phones, computers, tablets, and other mobile devices.

The book, which became a part of Intel's recommended reading list for developers, covers the revolution of mobile computing. It also highlights the two most important factors in architecture today: parallelism and memory hierarchy. This fully updated edition is comprised of six chapters that follow a consistent framework: explanation of the ideas in each chapter; a crosscutting issues section, which presents how the concepts covered in one chapter connect with those given in other chapters; a putting it all together section that links these concepts by discussing how they are applied in real machine; and detailed examples of misunderstandings and architectural traps commonly encountered by developers and architects.

Formulas for energy, static and dynamic power, integrated circuit costs, reliability, and availability are included. Other topics include the exploitation of instruction-level parallelism in high-performance processors, superscalar execution, dynamic scheduling and multithreading, vector architectures, multicore processors, and warehouse-scale computers WSCs.

There are updated case studies and completely new exercises. Additional reference appendices are available online. This book will be a valuable reference for computer architects, programmers, application developers, compiler and system software developers, computer system designers and application developers.

A highlight of the new edition is the significantly revised chapter on data-level parallelism, which demystifies GPU architectures with clear explanations using traditional computer architecture terminology.

I bought my first copy as I finished up my undergraduate degree and it remains one of my most frequently referenced texts today. When the fourth edition came out, there was so much new material that I needed to get it to stay current in the field. And, as I review the fifth edition, I realize that Hennessy and Patterson have done it again.

The entire text is heavily updated and Chapter 6 alone makes this new edition required reading for those wanting to really understand cloud and warehouse scale-computing.

Only Hennessy and Patterson have access to the insiders at Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and other cloud computing and internet-scale application providers and there is no better coverage of this important area anywhere in the industry. Today, warehouse-size computers contain that many servers, each consisting of dozens of independent processors and billions of transistors. The evolution of computer architecture has been rapid and relentless, but Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach has kept pace, with each edition accurately explaining and analyzing the important emerging ideas that make this field so exciting.

It explains key architecture concepts inside massmarket GPUs, maps them to traditional terms, and compares them with vector and SIMD architectures. Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach furthers its string of firsts in presenting comprehensive architecture coverage of significant new developments! The new edition of this now classic textbook highlights the ascendance of explicit parallelism data, thread, request by devoting a whole chapter to each type.

The chapter on data parallelism is particularly illuminating: the comparison and contrast between Vector SIMD, instruction level SIMD, and GPU cuts through the jargon associated with each architecture and exposes the similarities and differences between these architectures.

As with the previous editions, this new edition covers the latest technology trends. Two highlighted are the explosive growth of Personal Mobile Devices PMD and Warehouse Scale Computing WSC —where the focus has shifted towards a more sophisticated balance of performance and energy efficiency as compared with raw performance. These trends are fueling our demand for ever more processing capability which in turn is moving us further down the parallel path.

John L. Hennessy is the tenth president of Stanford University, where he has been a member of the faculty since in the departments of electrical engineering and computer science. He has also received seven honorary doctorates. As of , over 2 billion MIPS microprocessors have been shipped in devices ranging from video games and palmtop computers to laser printers and network switches.

Hennessy subsequently led the DASH Director Architecture for Shared Memory project, which prototyped the first scalable cache coherent multiprocessor; many of the key ideas have been adopted in modern multiprocessors. In addition to his technical activities and university responsibilities, he has continued to work with numerous start-ups both as an early-stage advisor and an investor.

David A. Patterson has been teaching computer architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, since joining the faculty in , where he holds the Pardee Chair of Computer Science. He was also involved in the Network of Workstations NOW project, which led to cluster technology used by Internet companies and later to cloud computing.

These projects earned three dissertation awards from ACM. The goal of the AMP Lab is develop scalable machine learning algorithms, warehouse-scale-computer-friendly programming models, and crowd-sourcing tools to gain valueable insights quickly from big data in the cloud. The goal of the Par Lab is to develop technologies to deliver scalable, portable, efficient, and productive software for parallel personal mobile devices.

No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

This book and the individual contributions contained in it are protected under copyright by the Publisher other than as may be noted herein. Knowledge and best practice in this field are constantly changing. As new research and experience broaden our understanding, changes in research methods or professional practices, may become necessary. Practitioners and researchers must always rely on their own experience and knowledge in evaluating and using any information or methods described herein.

In using such information or methods they should be mindful of their own safety and the safety of others, including parties for whom they have a professional responsibility. I belong, therefore, to that first wave of professionals who learned about our discipline using this book as a compass.

Perspective being a fundamental ingredient to a useful Foreword, I find myself at a disadvantage given how much of my own views have been colored by the previous four editions of this book. Another obstacle to clear perspective is that the student-grade reverence for these two superstars of Computer Science has not yet left me, despite or perhaps because of having had the chance to get to know them in the years since.

The last edition arrived just two years after the rampant industrial race for higher CPU clock frequency had come to its official end, with Intel cancelling its 4 GHz single-core developments and embracing multicore CPUs. Two years was plenty of time for John and Dave to present this story not as a random product line update, but as a defining computing technology inflection point of the last decade.

That fourth edition had a reduced emphasis on instruction-level parallelism ILP in favor of added material on thread-level parallelism, something the current edition takes even further by devoting two chapters to thread- and data-level parallelism while limiting ILP discussion to a single chapter. Readers who are being introduced to new graphics processing engines will benefit especially from the new Chapter 4 which focuses on data parallelism, explaining the different but slowly converging solutions offered by multimedia extensions in general-purpose processors and increasingly programmable graphics processing units.

Even though we are still in the middle of that multicore technology shift, this edition embraces what appears to be the next major one: cloud computing. In this case, the ubiquity of Internet connectivity and the evolution of compelling Web services are bringing to the spotlight very small devices smart phones, tablets and very large ones warehouse-scale computing systems.

In this new chapter, John and Dave present these new massive clusters as a distinctively new class of computers—an open invitation for computer architects to help shape this emerging field. What has made this book an enduring classic is that each edition is not an update but an extensive revision that presents the most current information and unparalleled insight into this fascinating and quickly changing field.

For me, after over twenty years in this profession, it is also another opportunity to experience that student-grade admiration for two remarkable teachers. Our excitement about the opportunities in computer architecture has not abated, and we echo what we said about the field in the first edition: It is not a dreary science of paper machines that will never work.

Our primary objective in writing our first book was to change the way people learn and think about computer architecture. We feel this goal is still valid and important. The field is changing daily and must be studied with real examples and measurements on real computers, rather than simply as a collection of definitions and designs that will never need to be realized. We offer an enthusiastic welcome to anyone who came along with us in the past, as well as to those who are joining us now.

Either way, we can promise the same quantitative approach to, and analysis of, real systems. As with earlier versions, we have strived to produce a new edition that will continue to be as relevant for professional engineers and architects as it is for those involved in advanced computer architecture and design courses. Like the first edition, this edition has a sharp focus on new platforms—personal mobile devices and warehouse-scale computers—and new architectures—multicore and GPUs.

As much as its predecessors, this edition aims to demystify computer architecture through an emphasis on cost-performance-energy trade-offs and good engineering design. We believe that the field has continued to mature and move toward the rigorous quantitative foundation of long-established scientific and engineering disciplines.

We said the fourth edition of Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach may have been the most significant since the first edition due to the switch to multicore chips. The feedback we received this time was that the book had lost the sharp focus of the first edition, covering everything equally but without emphasis and context. We believe most of the excitement is at the extremes in size of computing, with personal mobile devices PMDs such as cell phones and tablets as the clients and warehouse-scale computers offering cloud computing as the server.

Observant readers may seen the hint for cloud computing on the cover. We are struck by the common theme of these two extremes in cost, performance, and energy efficiency despite their difference in size. As a result, the running context through each chapter is computing for PMDs and for warehouse scale computers, and Chapter 6 is a brand-new chapter on the latter topic. The other theme is parallelism in all its forms.

We first identify the two types of application-level parallelism in Chapter 1: data-level parallelism DLP , which arises because there are many data items that can be operated on at the same time, and task-level parallelism TLP , which arises because tasks of work are created that can operate independently and largely in parallel.

We then explain the four architectural styles that exploit DLP and TLP: instruction-level parallelism ILP in Chapter 3; vector architectures and graphic processor units GPUs in Chapter 4, which is a brand-new chapter for this edition; thread-level parallelism in Chapter 5; and request-level parallelism RLP via warehouse-scale computers in Chapter 6, which is also a brand-new chapter for this edition.

We moved memory hierarchy earlier in the book to Chapter 2, and we moved the storage systems chapter to Appendix D. We are particularly proud about Chapter 4, which contains the most detailed and clearest explanation of GPUs yet, and Chapter 6, which is the first publication of the most recent details of a Google Warehousescale computer. As before, the first three appendices in the book give basics on the MIPS instruction set, memory hierachy, and pipelining for readers who have not read a book like Computer Organization and Design.

There are more pages in these appendices than there are in this book! This edition continues the tradition of using real-world examples to demonstrate the ideas, and the Putting It All Together sections are brand new. As before, we have taken a conservative approach to topic selection, for there are many more interesting ideas in the field than can reasonably be covered in a treatment of basic principles.

We have steered away from a comprehensive survey of every architecture a reader might encounter. Instead, our presentation focuses on core concepts likely to be found in any new machine. The key criterion remains that of selecting ideas that have been examined and utilized successfully enough to permit their discussion in quantitative terms. Our intent has always been to focus on material that is not available in equivalent form from other sources, so we continue to emphasize advanced content wherever possible.

Indeed, there are several systems here whose descriptions cannot be found in the literature. Chapter 1 has been beefed up in this edition. It includes formulas for energy, static power, dynamic power, integrated circuit costs, reliability, and availability. These formulas are also found on the front inside cover.

Our hope is that these topics can be used through the rest of the book. In addition to the classic quantitative principles of computer design and performance measurement, the PIAT section has been upgraded to use the new SPECPower benchmark. Our view is that the instruction set architecture is playing less of a role today than in , so we moved this material to Appendix A. It still uses the MIPS64 architecture. We then move onto memory hierarchy in Chapter 2, since it is easy to apply the cost-performance-energy principles to this material and memory is a critical resource for the rest of the chapters.

As in the past edition, Appendix B contains an introductory review of cache principles, which is available in case you need it. Chapter 2 discusses 10 advanced optimizations of caches. The chapter includes virtual machines, which offers advantages in protection, software management, and hardware management and play an important role in cloud computing.

Chapter 3 covers the exploitation of instruction-level parallelism in highperformance processors, including superscalar execution, branch prediction, speculation, dynamic scheduling, and multithreading.

As mentioned earlier, Appendix C is a review of pipelining in case you need it.

Computer Architecture, 5th Edition

Hennessy , and D. Morgan Kaufmann, Amsterdam, 5 edition, BibSonomy The blue social bookmark and publication sharing system. Toggle navigation Toggle navigation. Log in with your username. I've lost my password. Abstract The computing world today is in the middle of a revolution: mobile clients and cloud computing have emerged as the dominant paradigms driving programming and hardware innovation today.


Computer Architecture. A Quantitative Approach. Fourth Edition. John L. Hennessy. Stanford University. David A. Patterson. University of California at Berkeley.


Computer Architecture, Sixth Edition: A Quantitative Approach

YouTube Video 23 Branch predictor introduction and 1-bit bimodal predictor YouTube Video 24 2-bit predictor, indexing into a branch predictor table YouTube Video 25 Global predictor YouTube Video 26 Local predictor, tournament predictor, branch target buffer. YouTube Video 27 Out-of-order design 1, with a rename register file, part 1 YouTube Video 28 Out-of-order design 1, with a rename register file, part 2. YouTube Video 29 Out-of-order design 2, with a physical register file, part 1 YouTube Video 30 Out-of-order design 2, with a physical register file, part 2.

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. Patterson and J. Patterson , J.

Computer Architecture - A Quantitative Approach 5e pdf ( PDFDrive com )

IFB Arquitetura de Microcontroladores.

Download PDF

Explore a preview version of Computer Architecture, 5th Edition right now. Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, Fifth Edition, explores the ways that software and technology in the cloud are accessed by digital media, such as cell phones, computers, tablets, and other mobile devices. The book, which became a part of Intel's recommended reading list for developers, covers the revolution of mobile computing. It also highlights the two most important factors in architecture today: parallelism and memory hierarchy. This fully updated edition is comprised of six chapters that follow a consistent framework: explanation of the ideas in each chapter; a crosscutting issues section, which presents how the concepts covered in one chapter connect with those given in other chapters; a putting it all together section that links these concepts by discussing how they are applied in real machine; and detailed examples of misunderstandings and architectural traps commonly encountered by developers and architects.

By John L. Hennessy and David A. Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, Fifth Edition, explores the ways that software and technology in the cloud are accessed by digital media, such as cell phones, computers, tablets, and other mobile devices. The book, which became a part of Intel's recommended reading list for developers, covers the revolution of mobile computing. It also highlights the two most important factors in architecture today: parallelism and memory hierarchy. This fully updated edition is comprised of six chapters that follow a consistent framework: explanation of the ideas in each chapter; a crosscutting issues section, which presents how the concepts covered in one chapter connect with those given in other chapters; a putting it all together section that links these concepts by discussing how they are applied in real machine; and detailed examples of misunderstandings and architectural traps commonly encountered by developers and architects. Formulas for energy, static and dynamic power, integrated circuit costs, reliability, and availability are included.

Computer Architecture: A Quantitative Approach, Fifth Edition, explores the ways that software and technology in the cloud are accessed by digital media, such as cell phones, computers, tablets, and other mobile devices. The book, which became a part of Intel's recommended reading list for developers, covers the revolution of mobile computing. It also highlights the two most important factors in architecture today: parallelism and memory hierarchy. This fully updated edition is comprised of six chapters that follow a consistent framework: explanation of the ideas in each chapter; a crosscutting issues section, which presents how the concepts covered in one chapter connect with those given in other chapters; a putting it all together section that links these concepts by discussing how they are applied in real machine; and detailed examples of misunderstandings and architectural traps commonly encountered by developers and architects. Formulas for energy, static and dynamic power, integrated circuit costs, reliability, and availability are included.

Ранняя юность Грега Хейла не была омрачена криминальными историями, поскольку он провел ее в Корпусе морской пехоты США, где и познакомился с компьютером. Он стал лучшим программистом корпуса, и перед ним замаячила перспектива отличной военной карьеры.

ГЛАВА 93 Причастие. Халохот сразу же увидел Беккера: нельзя было не заметить пиджак защитного цвета да еще с кровавым пятном на боку. Светлый силуэт двигался по центральному проходу среди моря черных одежд. Он не должен знать, что я.  - Халохот улыбнулся.

 - Чего мы медлим. - Сэр, - удивленно произнесла Сьюзан, - просто это очень… - Да, да, - поддержал ее Джабба.  - Это очень странно.

1 Comments

Jacqueline L.
26.05.2021 at 08:24 - Reply

Computer Architecture. A Quantitative Approach. Fifth Edition. John L. Hennessy. Stanford University. David A. Patterson. University of California, Berkeley.

Leave a Reply